Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

After watching many films, cartoons, and reading comics based on the classic, I finally got around to read it. And I love it, I declare.

I am very sure that the rumour that the story was conceived on magic-mshrooms is very true. The randomness, the bizarre ideas, juicy world play and spinoffs on obvious is beyond anything I’ve ever read before. It’s a masterpiece of storytelling and dialogues.

There was nothing so VERY remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so VERY much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, ‘Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!’ (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat-pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge.

That’s one sentence! The prose and poetry are dancing together in this so very complex sentence. What a remarkable thing.

The next one is an example of how the poetic-prose and playful language sets the tone of the story:

In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.

And a few of my favourite things:

And she tried to fancy what the flame of a candle is like after the candle is blown out, for she could not remember ever having seen such a thing.

She generally gave herself very good advice, (though she very seldom followed it),

I shall only look up and say “Who am I then? Tell me that first, and then, if I like being that person, I’ll come up: if not, I’ll stay down here till I’m somebody else”—but, oh dear!’ cried Alice, with a sudden burst of tears, ‘I do wish they WOULD put their heads down! I am so VERY tired of being all alone here!’

‘Tut, tut, child!’ said the Duchess. ‘Everything’s got a moral, if only you can find it.’

The mouse’s tail/tale in chapter A Caucus-Race is a simple play of words and form and a remarkable thing:

         'Fury said to a
         mouse, That he
        met in the
       house,
     "Let us
      both go to
       law: I will
        prosecute
         YOU.—Come,
           I'll take no
           denial; We
          must have a
        trial: For
      really this
     morning I've
    nothing
    to do."
     Said the
      mouse to the
       cur, "Such
        a trial,
         dear Sir,
            With
          no jury
        or judge,
       would be
      wasting
      our
      breath."
       "I'll be
        judge, I'll
         be jury,"
            Said
         cunning
          old Fury:
          "I'll
          try the
            whole
            cause,
              and
           condemn
           you
          to
           death."'

Welcome to Planet Earth:

‘But I don’t want to go among mad people,’ Alice remarked.
‘Oh, you can’t help that,’ said the Cat: ‘we’re all mad here. I’m mad. You’re mad.’
‘How do you know I’m mad?’ said Alice.
‘You must be,’ said the Cat, ‘or you wouldn’t have come here.’

And this is conversation as inspired me in many ways since my childhood:

‘Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?’
‘That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,’ said the Cat.
‘I don’t much care where—’ said Alice.
‘Then it doesn’t matter which way you go,’ said the Cat.
‘—so long as I get SOMEWHERE,’ Alice added as an explanation.
‘Oh, you’re sure to do that,’ said the Cat, ‘if you only walk long enough.’

The state of Education:

‘I couldn’t afford to learn it.’ said the Mock Turtle with a sigh. ‘I only took the regular course.’
‘What was that?’ inquired Alice.
‘Reeling and Writhing, of course, to begin with,’ the Mock Turtle replied; ‘and then the different branches of Arithmetic—Ambition, Distraction, Uglification, and Derision.’

‘No, no! The adventures first,’ said the Gryphon in an impatient tone: ‘explanations take such a dreadful time.’

How I wish this was true:

‘That’s the reason they’re called lessons,’ the Gryphon remarked: ‘because they lessen from day to day.’

The Wordplay:

the Mock Turtle said: ‘no wise fish would go anywhere without a porpoise.’

The most profound thing of all:

‘I could tell you my adventures—beginning from this morning,’ said Alice a little timidly: ‘but it’s no use going back to yesterday, because I was a different person then.’

And our mr. obvious, but in this bizarre world – it sounds profound:

The White Rabbit put on his spectacles. ‘Where shall I begin, please your Majesty?’ he asked.
‘Begin at the beginning,’ the King said gravely, ‘and go on till you come to the end: then stop.’

A must read, once sober and once stoned. When you finally decide to read this – and you must – read the original.